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Mysoline Withdrawal

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Mysoline is a barbiturate used as an anticonvulsant and antiepileptic drug. Its generic name is primidone. Barbiturates are sedatives that are usually prescribed by a doctor to manage the symptoms of epilepsy. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved it for use in 1954.

Mysoline can be very valuable in treating epilepsy and benign essential tremor, (also called essential tremor). Benign essential tremor is a brain disorder that causes parts of the body to shake uncontrollably, usually the hands and forearms.

Mysoline can be dangerous because it is incredibly addictive. As is the case with any barbiturate, there is very little difference between a prescribed dose and an overdose.

Barbiturates are not commonly prescribed anymore because of their addiction possibilities. It is easy to become tolerant and then dependent on Mysoline. Addiction can develop, and it can be difficult to stop taking this drug. It is never recommended to stop taking a barbiturate, or any drug, on your own.

Mysoline withdrawal can be very tough. Withdrawal symptoms are strong and severe and can be deadly. It is crucial to undergo medical detoxification in an accredited addiction treatment program if you or someone you know needs to stop taking Mysoline.

Read more below about Mysoline withdrawal, and how to manage the severe symptoms.

 How Mysoline Works

Mysoline binds to the gamma-Aminobutyric (GABA) neurotransmitters in the brain. GABA transmitters are responsible for producing feelings of calm and intense relaxation. Mysoline tricks the mind into thinking that it’s GABA. This is how the feelings of deep relaxation and sedation generate, and it’s also how addiction to the drug can start. People who misuse or abuse Mysoline are going after these effects.

It is important to point out that barbiturates are not commonly prescribed anymore because of their addiction possibilities. However, Mysoline still is.  It is easy to become tolerant and then dependent on them. Addiction can develop, and it can be difficult to stop taking this drug.

It is never recommended to stop taking a barbiturate, or any drug, on your own. Severe withdrawal symptoms can develop and compel someone to take the drug again to avoid feeling those effects. Overdose and potential death are possible. 

If someone is given a prescription with a lower dose, they could start feeling some of the Mysoline withdrawal symptoms.

Mysoline Withdrawal Symptoms

Mysoline withdrawal can be very tough. Withdrawal symptoms are strong and can be deadly. It is crucial to undergo medical detoxification in an accredited addiction treatment program if you want to stop taking Mysoline.

The symptoms will occur if someone stops taking the medicine or is ordered to take a lower dosage than they were taking before. While withdrawal symptoms vary from one person to another, generally, someone will experience:

  • Nausea, vomiting
  • Fever
  •  Insomnia
  • Fever
  • Mood changes
  • Irritability, anxiety
  • Increase in the possibility of seizures
  • Depression, suicidal ideation

Stages of Mysoline Withdrawal Timeline

Early and minor withdrawal symptoms could start between eight to 12 hours after the last dose is taken.

The symptoms may include: 

  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Insomnia
  • Low blood pressure
  • Hand tremors
  • Muscle twitching
  • Weakness
  • Anxiety
  • Dizziness
  • Distorted vision

More intense Mysoline withdrawal symptoms begin about 16 hours after the last dose is taken. The symptoms last for about five days and may include convulsions and delirium.

Some people may experience the mental and emotional withdrawal symptoms from barbiturates for several months, and possibly years. This is called PAWS, which stands for post-acute withdrawal syndrome. This prolonged withdrawal period can produce more intense symptoms after the last bits of the drug have been detoxed out of the body.

Why Should I Detox?

When someone tries to quit taking drugs abruptly, it is called going cold turkey. Cold turkey detox can be difficult and painful. Cold turkey withdrawal from some drugs can even be deadly, like withdrawing from barbiturates, such as Mysoline. 

It is crucial to find a medication-assisted detox program during Mysoline withdrawal. Medical and addiction professionals will be there supporting you during detox to ensure your physical and mental well-being.

Medical detox also gives you a better chance for long-term recovery, and more so when the full course of care is followed.

What Is the Next Treatment Step?

Mysoline is a barbiturate which is classified as a highly addictive medicine.

A full continuum treatment program starts with medical detox and graduates to the next stages of care, which are inpatient to outpatient care.

Detox

As previously mentioned, medical detox is the first step in addiction treatment. It is imperative to go through it as its goal is your medical stabilization. Medical detox can last from three to seven days.

Upon entering medical detox, experienced addiction specialists will conduct a complete medical assessment to determine what level of addiction you are in. They will also assess any other medical conditions you may have that requires treatment.

The medical team usually involves doctors, nurses, and support staff. You will be monitored 24 hours a day and seven days per week to manage uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms and prevent any perilous symptoms stemming from barbiturate use.

Emotional support is also provided to help you get through the psychological symptoms of withdrawal, such as depression or anxiety. The medical detox team will create a long-term treatment plan for you once you are medically stabilized.

Residential

Residential treatment is the next stage of addiction treatment if you need continued medical treatment. People with co-occurring medical conditions of people experiencing post-acute withdrawal symptoms are recommended to go through this type of inpatient treatment. It is an intensive form of therapy in which you will be seeing a therapist on a regular basis.

Partial Hospitalization

Partial hospitalization (PHP) is another step in addiction treatment. It can either be after medical detox or after residential inpatient. People in this stage of addiction treatment may reside at a transitional living facility as they undergo strict, structured, and supportive therapy for five to six hours a day. 

Different types of therapy are included, such as group, family, individual, and alternative types of therapy, such as meditation. You will also be focusing on new life skills, coping mechanisms, and developing a plan to prevent relapse. All of this is to put you securely in the path of long-term recovery.

Intensive Outpatient

The next step, after PHP, is the intensive outpatient program or IOP. This type of treatment allows you to live at home while still participating in therapy. It involves nine or more hours of clinical therapy each week, depending on your treatment plan. The sessions are scheduled a few times per week. An IOP will help you stay on the path to recovery with newly learned resources and tools. These can help you manage cravings, stress, and the other issues that affect daily life.

Alumni

It takes a community of friends supporting each other in recovery to feel and be free from addiction. Aftercare programming is an essential part of addiction treatment because, without it, you would be alone in navigating life and its stresses.

Aftercare provides weekly meetings, occasional outings, social events, and other programs in which you will meet and get to know other people who have been through treatment.

The alumni program is all about strengthening your support system and providing you with new friends that know what you’ve been through. You will have great people resources to give you advice on relapse prevention, work-related situations, and life without substance abuse.

This community of peers is your go-to life support network.

Sources

Drugs.com. Mysoline. Multum. C., February 2019. from https://www.drugs.com/mtm/mysoline.html

Healthline. Essential Tumor. from https://www.healthline.com/health/essential-tremor#outlook

Primidone. from https://www.webmd.com/drugs/2/drug-8696/primidone-oral/details

Physician’s Desk Reference. PDR. Primidone. from https://www.pdr.net/drug-summary/Mysoline-primidone-775

Psychology Today. Detoxing After Detox: The Perils of Post-Acute Withdrawal. Mager, D. MSW. May 2015. from https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/some-assembly-required/201505/detoxing-after-detox-the-perils-post-acute-withdrawal

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